Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMJ Open. 2018 Feb 8;8(2):e018846. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018846.

Assessing the nutrient intake of a low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LCHF) diet: a hypothetical case study design.

Author information

1
Human Potential Centre, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.
2
Telethon Type 1 Diabetes Family Centre, Stirling, Western Australia, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LCHF) diet is becoming increasingly employed in clinical dietetic practice as a means to manage many health-related conditions. Yet, it continues to remain contentious in nutrition circles due to a belief that the diet is devoid of nutrients and concern around its saturated fat content. This work aimed to assess the micronutrient intake of the LCHF diet under two conditions of saturated fat thresholds.

DESIGN:

In this descriptive study, two LCHF meal plans were designed for two hypothetical cases representing the average Australian male and female weight-stable adult. National documented heights, a body mass index of 22.5 to establish weight and a 1.6 activity factor were used to estimate total energy intake using the Schofield equation. Carbohydrate was limited to <130 g, protein was set at 15%-25% of total energy and fat supplied the remaining calories. One version of the diet aligned with the national saturated fat guideline threshold of <10% of total energy and the other included saturated fat ad libitum.

PRIMARY OUTCOMES:

The primary outcomes included all micronutrients, which were assessed using FoodWorks dietary analysis software against national Australian/New Zealand nutrient reference value (NRV) thresholds.

RESULTS:

All of the meal plans exceeded the minimum NRV thresholds, apart from iron in the female meal plans, which achieved 86%-98% of the threshold. Saturated fat intake was logistically unable to be reduced below the 10% threshold for the male plan but exceeded the threshold by 2 g (0.6%).

CONCLUSION:

Despite macronutrient proportions not aligning with current national dietary guidelines, a well-planned LCHF meal plan can be considered micronutrient replete. This is an important finding for health professionals, consumers and critics of LCHF nutrition, as it dispels the myth that these diets are suboptimal in their micronutrient supply. As with any diet, for optimal nutrient achievement, meals need to be well formulated.

KEYWORDS:

LCHF; NRVs; low-carbohydrate, high-fat; nutrient reference values

PMID:
29439004
PMCID:
PMC5829852
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018846
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: CZ has coauthored two books called What the Fat?—Fat’s In, Sugar’s Out and What the Fat—Sports Performance, which both assume an LCHF nutrition approach.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center