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Int Health. 2018 Sep 1;10(5):356-362. doi: 10.1093/inthealth/ihx074.

Lower than expected elevated tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity in adults with sickle cell disease in Nigeria.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Bayero University and Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
3
Department of Hematology, Bayero University and Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria.
4
Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
5
Department of Health Policy, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

Abstract

Background:

Cardiopulmonary disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with sickle cell disease (SCD). Tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRJV) and predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1%) predicted are independently associated with death in SCD. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of elevated TRJV and the association, if any, between TRJV and FEV1% predicted among persons with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) in Nigeria.

Methods:

Using a cross-sectional design, we enrolled 100 adult Nigerians (≥15 y) with SCA. We screened participants using Doppler echocardiogram to determine their TRJV and assessed their lung function with spirometry.

Results:

The prevalence of elevated TRJV was 6%, with 74% of participants having low FEV1% predicted (<70%). TRJV was negatively correlated with FEV1%, but this finding was not statistically significant (Spearman's ρ=-0.0263, p=0.8058).

Conclusions:

We found a low prevalence of elevated TRJV and a trend in association between TRJV and FEV1% predicted in Nigerian adults with SCA. Our findings underscore the need to explore further the relationship between SCD and cardiopulmonary disease in adults.

PMID:
29438485
DOI:
10.1093/inthealth/ihx074
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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