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Br J Psychiatry. 2018 Feb;212(2):96-102. doi: 10.1192/bjp.2017.26.

Cardiometabolic dysregulation and cognitive decline: potential role of depressive symptoms.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry,McGill University,Montreal,Douglas Mental Health University Institute,Montreal and Montreal Diabetes Research Centre,Montreal,Quebec,Canada.
2
Department of Psychiatry,McGill University,Montreal,and Douglas Mental Health University Institute,Montreal Quebec,Canada.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,McGill University,Montreal,Quebec,Canada.
4
Department of Epidemiology,Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam,Rotterdam,the Netherlands.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health,University College London (UCL),London,UK.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health,University College London (UCL),London,UK and INSERM U1018,Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health,Paul Brousse Hospital,Villejuif,France.
7
Department of Epidemiology,Department of Psychiatry and Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam,Rotterdam,the Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have examined associations of cardiometabolic factors with depression and cognition separately. Aims To determine if depressive symptoms mediate the association between cardiometabolic factors and cognitive decline in two community studies.

METHOD:

Data for the analyses were drawn from the Rotterdam Study, the Netherlands (n = 2940) and the Whitehall II study, UK (n = 4469).

RESULTS:

Mediation analyses suggested a direct association between cardiometabolic factors and cognitive decline and an indirect association through depression: poorer cardiometabolic status at time 1 was associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms at time 2 (standardised regression coefficient 0.07 and 0.06, respectively), which, in turn, was associated with greater cognitive decline between time 2 and time 3 (standardised regression coefficient of -0.15 and -0.41, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Evidence from two independent cohort studies suggest an association between cardiometabolic dysregulation and cognitive decline and that depressive symptoms tend to precede this decline. Declaration of interest None.

PMID:
29436332
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.2017.26
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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