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Cureus. 2017 Dec 5;9(12):e1908. doi: 10.7759/cureus.1908.

Mentor-mentee Relationship: A Win-Win Contract In Graduate Medical Education.

Author information

1
Graduate Medical Education, HCA/UCF North Florida Division.
2
GME, Ocala Regional Medical Center/ University of Central Florida College of Medicine.

Abstract

Scholarly activities (i.e., the discovery of new knowledge; development of new technologies, methods, materials, or uses; integration of knowledge leading to new understanding) are intended to measure the quality and quantity of dissemination of knowledge. A successful mentorship program is necessary during residency to help residents achieve the six core competencies (patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, systems-based practice, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills) required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The role of the mentor in this process is pivotal in the advancement of the residents' knowledge about evidence-based medicine. With this process, while mentees become more self-regulated, exhibit confidence in their performance, and demonstrate more insight and aptitude in their jobs, mentors also achieve elevated higher self-esteem, enhanced leadership skills, and personal gratification. As such, we may conclude that mentoring is a two-sided relationship; i.e., a 'win-win' style of commitment between the mentor and mentee. Hence, both parties will eventually advance academically, as well as professionally.

KEYWORDS:

advisor; clinical training; graduate medical education; internship and residency; medical resident; mentor; mentorship; residency; resident training; scholarly activity

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

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