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Addict Behav. 2018 Jun;81:78-83. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.02.008. Epub 2018 Feb 6.

E-cigarette advertising exposure in e-cigarette naïve adolescents and subsequent e-cigarette use: A longitudinal cohort study.

Author information

1
Yale School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, United States. Electronic address: deepa.camenga@yale.edu.
2
Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Electronic (E-) cigarettes are one of the most popular tobacco products used by adolescents today. This study examined whether exposure to advertisements in (1) social networking sites (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest/Google Plus), (2) traditional media (television/radio, magazines, billboards), or (3) retail stores (convenience stores, mall kiosks, tobacco shops) was associated with subsequent e-cigarette use in a longitudinal cohort of adolescents.

METHODS:

Data were drawn from longitudinal surveys conducted in fall 2013 (wave 1) and spring 2014 (wave 2) of a school-based cohort attending 3 high schools and 2 middle schools in Connecticut. Adolescents were asked about tobacco use behaviors and where they had recently seen e-cigarette advertising at wave 1. We used logistic regression to determine whether advertising exposure at wave 1 increased the odds of e-cigarette use by wave 2, controlling for demographics and cigarette smoking status at wave 1.

RESULTS:

Among those who have never used e-cigarettes in wave 1 (n = 1742), 9.6% reported e-cigarette use at wave 2. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that exposure to e-cigarette advertising on Facebook (OR 2.12 = p < 0.02) at wave 1, but not other venues, significantly increased the odds of subsequent e-cigarette use wave 2. Age, white race, and cigarette smoking at wave 1 also was associated with e-cigarette use at wave 2.

CONCLUSION:

This study provides one of the first longitudinal examinations demonstrating that exposure to e-cigarette advertising on social networking sites among youth who had never used e-cigarettes increases the likelihood of subsequent e-cigarette use.

KEYWORDS:

Advertisement; Electronic cigarette; Youth

PMID:
29432916
PMCID:
PMC5845830
[Available on 2019-06-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.02.008

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