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J Cancer Educ. 2019 Jun;34(3):446-454. doi: 10.1007/s13187-018-1322-z.

Mentoring, Training, and Scholarly Productivity Experiences of Cancer-Related Health Disparities Research Trainees: Do Outcomes Differ for Underrepresented Scientists?

Felder TM1,2,3, Braun KL4,5, Wigfall L6, Sevoyan M7,8, Vyas S7,8, Khan S7, Brandt HM9,7,10, Rogers C11,12, Tanjasiri S13,14, Armstead CA9,7,15, Hébert JR9,7,8.

Author information

1
South Carolina Cancer Disparities Community Network, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. feldert@mailbox.sc.edu.
2
College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. feldert@mailbox.sc.edu.
3
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. feldert@mailbox.sc.edu.
4
'Imi Hale-Native Hawaiian Cancer Network, Papa Ola Lokahi, Honolulu, HI, USA.
5
Office of Public Health Studies, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA.
6
College of Education and Human Development, Department of Health and Kinesiology, Division of Health Education, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.
7
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
8
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
9
South Carolina Cancer Disparities Community Network, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
10
Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
11
Minnesota Community Networks Center for Eliminating Cancer Disparities, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
12
University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
13
WINCART: Weaving an Islander Network for Cancer Awareness, Research and Training, Columbia, SC, USA.
14
Department of Health Science, California State University-Fullerton, Fullerton, CA, USA.
15
Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

Abstract

The study aims to explore variation in scholarly productivity outcomes by underrepresented status among a diverse sample of researchers in a community-engaged training program. We identified 141 trainees from a web-based survey of researchers in the National Cancer Institute-funded, Community Networks Program Centers (CNPCs) (2011-2016). We conducted a series of multiple logistic regression models to estimate the effect of National Institutes of Health (NIH)-defined underrepresented status on four, self-reported, scholarly productivity outcomes in the previous 5 years: number of publications (first-authored and total) and funded grants (NIH and any agency). Sixty-five percent (n = 92) indicated NIH underrepresented status. In final adjusted models, non-NIH underrepresented (vs. underrepresented) trainees reported an increased odds of having more than the median number of total publications (> 9) (OR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.21-8.65) and any grant funding (OR = 5.10, 95% CI 1.77-14.65). Reporting ≥ 1 mentors (vs. none) was also positively associated (p < 0.05) with these outcomes. The CNPC underrepresented trainees had similar success in first-authored publications and NIH funding as non-underrepresented trainees, but not total publications and grants. Examining trainees' mentoring experiences over time in relation to scholarly productivity outcomes is needed.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer-related health disparities; Mentoring; Underrepresented scientists

PMID:
29430610
PMCID:
PMC6087686
[Available on 2020-06-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s13187-018-1322-z

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