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Autoimmun Rev. 2018 Apr;17(4):413-421. doi: 10.1016/j.autrev.2017.12.002. Epub 2018 Feb 9.

Cellular immune regulation in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitides.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9713 GZ, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.von.borstel@umcg.nl.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9713 GZ, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9713 GZ, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9713 GZ, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9713 GZ, The Netherlands; Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9713 GZ, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by necrotizing inflammation of small- to medium-sized blood vessels, affecting primarily the lungs and kidneys. Both animal and human studies show that the balance between inflammatory- and regulatory T- and B cells determines the AAV disease pathogenesis. Recent evidence shows malfunctioning of the regulatory lymphocyte compartment in AAV. In this review we summarize the immune regulatory properties of both T- and B cells in patients with AAV and discuss how aberrations herein might contribute to the disease pathogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

ANCA; B regulatory cells; T regulatory cells; Vasculitides

PMID:
29428808
DOI:
10.1016/j.autrev.2017.12.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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