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J Gambl Stud. 2018 Dec;34(4):1205-1239. doi: 10.1007/s10899-018-9749-z.

Gambling Disorder in Veterans: A Review of the Literature and Implications for Future Research.

Levy L1,2, Tracy JK3,4,5.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, MSTF 257, Baltimore, MD, 21201, USA. llevy@law.umaryland.edu.
2
The Research Program on Gambling, Maryland Center of Excellence on Problem Gambling, Baltimore, MD, USA. llevy@law.umaryland.edu.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, MSTF 257, Baltimore, MD, 21201, USA.
4
The Research Program on Gambling, Maryland Center of Excellence on Problem Gambling, Baltimore, MD, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

To review the scientific literature examining gambling behavior in military veterans in order to summarize factors associated with gambling behavior in this population. Database searches were employed to identify articles specifically examining gambling behavior in military veterans. Cumulative search results identified 52 articles (1983-2017) examining gambling behavior in veteran populations. Articles generally fell into one or more of the following categories: prevalence, psychological profiles and psychiatric comorbidities, treatment evaluations, measurement, and genetic contributions to gambling disorder. Results from reviewed articles are presented and implications for future research discussed. Research to date has provided an excellent foundation to inform potential screening, intervention and research activities going forward. The authors suggest that a public health approach to future research endeavors would strengthen the evidence base regarding gambling in veteran populations and better inform strategies for screening, prevention and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Gambling disorder; Problem gambling; Veterans

PMID:
29427019
DOI:
10.1007/s10899-018-9749-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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