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J Infect Dis. 2018 Apr 23;217(10):1590-1600. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy075.

Very Low Prevalence of Vaccine Human Papillomavirus Types Among 18- to 35-Year Old Australian Women 9 Years Following Implementation of Vaccination.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne.
2
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria.
3
School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Victoria.
5
National HPV Vaccination Program Register, Victorian Cytology Service, East Melbourne, Victoria.
6
Family Planning New South Wales, Sydney.
7
Discipline of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Neonatology, University of Sydney.
8
Family Planning Victoria, Melbourne.
9
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria.
10
Sydney University Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, Children's Hospital Westmead.
11
School of Public Health and Community Medicine.
12
The Kirby Institute for Infection and Immunity in Society, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

Introduction:

A quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination program targeting females aged 12-13 years commenced in Australia in 2007, with catch-up vaccination of 14-26 year olds through 2009. We evaluated the program's impact on HPV prevalence among women aged 18-35 in 2015.

Methods:

HPV prevalence among women aged 18-24 and 25-35 was compared with prevalence in these age groups in 2005-2007. For women aged 18-24, we also compared prevalence with that in a postvaccine study conducted in 2010-2012.

Results:

For the 2015 sample, Vaccination Register-confirmed 3-dose coverage was 53.3% (65.0% and 40.3% aged 18-24 and 25-35, respectively). Prevalence of vaccine HPV types decreased from 22.7% (2005-2007) and 7.3% (2010-2012), to 1.5% (2015) (P trend < .001) among women aged 18-24, and from 11.8% (2005-2007) to 1.1% (2015) (P = .001) among those aged 25-35.

Conclusions:

This study, reporting the longest surveillance follow-up to date, shows prevalence of vaccine-targeted HPV types has continued to decline among young women. A substantial fall also occurred in women aged 25-35, despite lower coverage. Strong herd protection and effectiveness of less than 3 vaccine doses likely contributed to these reductions.

PMID:
29425358
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiy075

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