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Inflammopharmacology. 2018 Aug;26(4):1093-1101. doi: 10.1007/s10787-018-0450-8. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Ginger rhizome enhances the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of paracetamol in an experimental mouse model of fibromyalgia.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Immunology, School of Medicine, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Dr. Fedriani 3, 41071, Seville, Spain. delapaz@us.es.
2
Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Universidad de Sevilla, C/Profesor Garcia Gonzalez 2, 41012, Seville, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The dried rhizome of ginger has been widely used for more than 2500 years in folk medicine for the treatment of various diseases that involve inflammation or are caused by oxidative stress.

AIMS:

This study was designed to compare the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of dried powdered ginger rhizome (GR) and paracetamol (APAP) on an experimental mouse model of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS).

METHODS:

Forty-eight female C57BL/6 J mice were used for the experiments. The animals were allocated in six groups (n = 8). Each group received one of the following treatments for 8 weeks: healthy control, ICS group, ICS + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day), ICS + GR (0.5%); ICS + GR (1%), and ICS + GR (0.5%) + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day). After treatment, symptoms of FMS were induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS).

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

GR consumption improved mechanical and thermal allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia and improved behavioural changes related to cognitive disturbances, anxiety, and depression. In addition, GR also significantly decreased the inflammatory response of proinflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE2, TXB2, and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated macrophages. The effects of APAP were significantly enhanced by co-administration with GR. These findings provide evidence that the daily consumption of GR enhances the anti-nociceptive effect of APAP in mice, improves other cognitive disturbances associated with chronic pain, and reduces the inflammatory state generated in an experimental FMS model.

KEYWORDS:

Acetaminophen; Allodynia; Fibromyalgia; Ginger; Hyperalgesia; Inflammation

PMID:
29423878
DOI:
10.1007/s10787-018-0450-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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