Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Relig Health. 2018 Dec;57(6):2301-2312. doi: 10.1007/s10943-018-0573-7.

Moral Objections and Fear of Hell: An Important Barrier to Suicidality.

Author information

1
Psychiatric Acute Care Unit, Eleos, Christian Institution for Mental Health Care, Printerweg 21, 3821 AP, Amersfoort, The Netherlands. b.vandenbrink@kicg.nl.
2
Kennisinstituut christelijke ggz, Center for Christian Mental Health Care, Amersfoort, The Netherlands. b.vandenbrink@kicg.nl.
3
Kennisinstituut christelijke ggz, Center for Christian Mental Health Care, Amersfoort, The Netherlands.
4
University of Humanistic Studies, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Emergency Psychiatry, Altrecht Mental Health Care, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Residency Training, Altrecht Mental Health Care, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

This review explores the literature to test the hypothesis that 'moral objections to suicide (MOS), especially the conviction of going to hell after committing suicide, exert a restraining effect on suicide and suicidality.' Medline and PsycInfo were searched using all relevant search terms; all relevant articles were selected, rated and reviewed. Fifteen cross-sectional studies were available on this topic, and raise sufficient evidence to confirm a restraining effect of MOS, and sparse data on fear of hell. MOS seem to counteract especially the development of suicidal intent and attempts, and possibly the lethality of suicidal attempts. A differential pattern of influence of MOS on the suicidal continuum is suggested.

KEYWORDS:

Fear of hell; Moral objections; Religion; Suicidality; Suicide attempts

PMID:
29423644
DOI:
10.1007/s10943-018-0573-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center