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Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 8;8(1):2663. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-20932-x.

Long-Term Study of Heart Rate Variability Responses to Changes in the Solar and Geomagnetic Environment.

Author information

1
Prince Sultan Cardiac Center, Alhasa, Saudi Arabia.
2
HeartMath Institute, Boulder Creek, CA, USA.
3
Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
4
Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
5
NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, CA, USA. viktor.stolc-1@nasa.gov.

Abstract

This long-term study examined relationships between solar and magnetic factors and the time course and lags of autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to changes in solar and geomagnetic activity. Heart rate variability (HRV) was recorded for 72 consecutive hours each week over a five-month period in 16 participants in order to examine ANS responses during normal background environmental periods. HRV measures were correlated with solar and geomagnetic variables using multivariate linear regression analysis with Bonferroni corrections for multiple comparisons after removing circadian influences from both datasets. Overall, the study confirms that daily ANS activity responds to changes in geomagnetic and solar activity during periods of normal undisturbed activity and it is initiated at different times after the changes in the various environmental factors and persist over varying time periods. Increase in solar wind intensity was correlated with increases in heart rate, which we interpret as a biological stress response. Increase in cosmic rays, solar radio flux, and Schumann resonance power was all associated with increased HRV and parasympathetic activity. The findings support the hypothesis that energetic environmental phenomena affect psychophysical processes that can affect people in different ways depending on their sensitivity, health status and capacity for self-regulation.

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