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Appl Nurs Res. 2018 Feb;39:65-70. doi: 10.1016/j.apnr.2017.11.001. Epub 2017 Nov 4.

Depressive symptoms are associated with in-hospital complications following acute myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
College of Nursing, Applied Science Private University, Amman, Jordan. Electronic address: mohannadeid@yahoo.com.
2
College of Nursing, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA.
3
College of Nursing, Applied Science Private University, Amman, Jordan.

Abstract

AIM:

To examine the effect of depressive symptoms on in-hospital complication rates after Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI).

BACKGROUND:

Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is the primary cause of death worldwide. AMI is the most common consequence of CHD. Depressive symptoms are an important risk factor for CHD and increased risk of AMI. Understanding the relationship between depressive symptoms and short term complications for patients with AMI is important for determining their needs, developing interventions, and evaluating the outcomes of interventions.

METHODS:

A prospective observational study was conducted with 175 patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) of four large hospitals in Jordan. During the interview, within 72h (mean, 38±16h) of admission to the hospital, participants completed the sociodemographic and clinical questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory Scale.

RESULTS:

The mean age was 66.9±11.0years. The number of patients with mild, moderate, and severe depressive symptoms who developed complications was significantly higher than those with minimal depressive symptoms, p˂0.001. Patients with mild, moderate, and severe depressive symptoms had longer lengths of stay in the ICU and in hospital than patients with minimal depressive symptoms. Patients with mild, moderate and severe depressive symptoms were at 1.22 times higher risk for developing complications than patients with minimal depressive symptoms. Moreover, previous AMI history increased the risk for developing complication by 150%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Depressive symptoms were an independent predictor of complications and increased length of stay after AMI. Interventions to control depressive symptoms early after AMI are necessary.

KEYWORDS:

Coronary disease; Culture; Depressive symptoms; Myocardial infarction

PMID:
29422179
DOI:
10.1016/j.apnr.2017.11.001

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