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Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jan;126:141-149. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.11.003. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

Bacterial community structure in response to environmental impacts in the intertidal sediments along the Yangtze Estuary, China.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science (Ministry of Education), School of Geographical Sciences, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200241, China.
2
Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science (Ministry of Education), School of Geographical Sciences, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200241, China; State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062, China. Electronic address: yyang@geo.ecnu.edu.cn.

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the characteristics of bacterial communities in intertidal sediments along the Yangtze Estuary and their responses to environmental factors. The results showed that bacterial abundance was significantly correlated with salinity, SO42- and total organic carbon, while bacterial diversity was significantly correlated with SO42- and total nitrogen. At different taxonomic levels, both the dominant taxa and their abundances varied among the eight samples, with Proteobacteria being the most dominant phylum in general. Cluster analysis revealed that the bacterial community structure was influenced by river runoff and sewerage discharge. Moreover, SO42-, salinity and total phosphorus were the vital environmental factors that influenced the bacterial community structure. Quantitative PCR and sequencing of sulphate-reducing bacteria indicated that the sulphate reduction process occurs frequently in intertidal sediments. These findings are important to understand the microbial ecology and biogeochemical cycles in estuarine environments.

KEYWORDS:

Bacterial community; Intertidal sediment; MiSeq sequencing; Sulphate reduction; Yangtze Estuary

PMID:
29421081
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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