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Circ Res. 2018 Feb 2;122(3):506-522. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.310939.

Translational Implications of Platelets as Vascular First Responders.

Author information

1
From the Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (R.C.B.); and Gill Heart and Vascular Institute (T.S., S.S.S.) and Lexington VA Medical Center (T.S., S.S.S.), University of Kentucky School of Medicine. richard.becker@uc.edu.
2
From the Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (R.C.B.); and Gill Heart and Vascular Institute (T.S., S.S.S.) and Lexington VA Medical Center (T.S., S.S.S.), University of Kentucky School of Medicine.

Abstract

Platelets play a vital role in normal hemostasis to stem blood loss at sites of vascular injury by tethering and adhering to sites of injury, recruiting other platelets and blood cells to the developing clot, releasing vasoactive small molecules and proteins, and assembling and activating plasma coagulation proteins in a tightly regulated temporal and spatial manner. In synchrony with specific end products of coagulation, primarily cross-linked fibrin, a stable thrombus quickly forms. Far beyond physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis, emerging evidence supports platelets playing a pivotal role in vascular homeostasis, inflammation, cellular repair, regeneration, and wide range of autocrine and paracrine functions. In essence, platelets play both structural and functional roles as reporters, messengers, and active transporters surveying the vasculature for cues of environmental or developmental stimuli and participating as first responders.1 In this review, we will provide a contemporary perspective of platelet physiology, including fundamental, translational, and clinical constructs that apply directly to human health and disease.

KEYWORDS:

blood platelets; fibrin; humans; platelet activation; thrombosis

PMID:
29420211
PMCID:
PMC5808568
[Available on 2019-02-02]
DOI:
10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.310939

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