Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 7;8(1):2595. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-20953-6.

Pyrazines from bacteria and ants: convergent chemistry within an ecological niche.

Author information

1
Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, 14040903, Brazil.
2
Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, United States of America.
3
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B4, Canada.
4
Departamento de Biologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, 14040901, Brazil.
5
Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 53706, United States of America.
6
Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, 14040903, Brazil. mtpupo@fcfrp.usp.br.

Abstract

Ants use pheromones to coordinate their communal activity. Volatile pyrazines, for instance, mediate food resource gathering and alarm behaviors in different ant species. Here we report that leaf-cutter ant-associated bacteria produce a family of pyrazines that includes members previously identified as ant trail and alarm pheromones. We found that L-threonine induces the bacterial production of the trail pheromone pyrazines, which are common for the host leaf-cutter ants. Isotope feeding experiments revealed that L-threonine along with sodium acetate were the biosynthetic precursors of these natural products and a biosynthetic pathway was proposed.

PMID:
29416082
PMCID:
PMC5803209
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-20953-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center