Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Death Dis. 2018 Feb 7;9(2):177. doi: 10.1038/s41419-017-0238-6.

Antitumor activity of EGFR-specific CAR T cells against non-small-cell lung cancer cells in vitro and in mice.

Author information

1
Departments of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Changhai Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, 200438, Shanghai, China.
2
Department of Biliary Tract Surgery I, The Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, 200438, Shanghai, China.
3
Shanghai Cell Therapy Research Institute, 201805, Shanghai, China.
4
Laboratory of Gene and Viral Therapy, The Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, 200438, Shanghai, China.
5
Department of Biotherapy, The Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, 200438, Shanghai, China.
6
Departments of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Changhai Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, 200438, Shanghai, China. qiangli19621217@126.com.
7
Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Shanghai First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200080, Shanghai, China. qiangli19621217@126.com.
8
Shanghai Cell Therapy Research Institute, 201805, Shanghai, China. hj-jin@hotmail.com.
9
Laboratory of Gene and Viral Therapy, The Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, 200438, Shanghai, China. hj-jin@hotmail.com.
10
Shanghai Cell Therapy Research Institute, 201805, Shanghai, China. qianqj@sino-gene.cn.
11
Laboratory of Gene and Viral Therapy, The Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, 200438, Shanghai, China. qianqj@sino-gene.cn.
12
Department of Biotherapy, The Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, 200438, Shanghai, China. qianqj@sino-gene.cn.

Abstract

Effective control of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains clinically challenging, especially during advanced stages of the disease. This study developed an adoptive T-cell treatment through expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to target human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in NSCLC. We optimized the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to engineer human T cells for the expression of EGFR-CAR, consisting of EGFR scFv, transmembrane domain, and intracellular 4-1BB-CD3ζ signaling domains. The modified CAR T cells exhibited expansion capability and anticancer efficacy in a time- and antigen-dependent manner in vitro as well as regression of EGFR-positive human lung cancer xenografts in vivo. EGFR-CAR T therapy is a promising strategy to improve the efficacy and potency of the adoptive immunotherapy in NSCLC. Moreover, EGFR-CAR T therapy could become a clinical application for NSCLC patients in the future.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center