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J Atheroscler Thromb. 2018 Sep 1;25(9):836-845. doi: 10.5551/jat.42150. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Associations of Tobacco Smoking with Impaired Endothelial Function: The Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS).

Author information

1
Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine.
2
Osaka Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention.
3
Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology.
4
Department of Public Health, Dokkyo Medical University, School of Medicine.
5
Department of Public Health Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba.
6
Radiation Medical Science Center for the Fukushima Health Management Survey, Fukushima Medical University.

Abstract

AIMS:

Smoking impairs endothelial function as an acute effect. However, few population-based studies have examined the association between smoking status and endothelial function or the dose-response and duration-response association of smoking with endothelial function. We examined whether smoking habits were associated with impaired endothelial function depending on smoking dose and duration.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study of 910 men and women aged 30-79 years from 2013 to 2016. Statistical analyses of the data were conducted between 2016 and 2017. Endothelial function was assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) measurement. Low FMD was defined in two ways as the cutoff point based on the lowest quartile of %FMD (<5.1%) and median of %FMD (<6.8%), regarding as impaired endothelial function. We investigated the smoking status in terms of cigarettes consumed per day and the duration of smoking.

RESULTS:

Heavy and chronic smokers were associated with a high prevalence of impaired endothelial function. Those associations did not change substantially after adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors. Among all participants, the multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of low FMD (<5.1%) with reference to never smokers were 2.23 (1.00-5.14) for current heavy smokers of ≥ 30 cigarettes per day, 1.83 (1.04-3.20) for heavy smokers of ≥ 40 pack-years, and 2.16 (1.15-4.06) for chronic smokers of ≥ 40 years. For low FMD (<6.8%) those values was 2.17 (1.01-5.05), 1.70 (1.01-2.86), and 1.98 (1.07-3.69), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Similar associations were observed among only men. Heavy or long-term tobacco smoking may induce impaired endothelial function.

KEYWORDS:

Flow-mediated dilation; Impaired endothelial function; Smoking

PMID:
29415955
PMCID:
PMC6143782
DOI:
10.5551/jat.42150
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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