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Respir Med. 2018 Jan;134:47-53. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2017.11.021. Epub 2017 Dec 1.

Respiratory effects of trichloroethylene.

Author information

1
Inserm, U1168, VIMA: Aging and Chronic Diseases, Epidemiological and Public Health Approaches, F-94807, Villejuif, France; Univ Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, UMR-S 1168, F-78180, Montigny le Bretonneux, France.
2
Inserm, U1168, VIMA: Aging and Chronic Diseases, Epidemiological and Public Health Approaches, F-94807, Villejuif, France; Univ Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, UMR-S 1168, F-78180, Montigny le Bretonneux, France; AP-HP UVSQ, Occupational Health Unit/Population-Based Epidemiological Cohorts Unit, UMS 011, University Hospital of Poincaré, Garches, France.
3
Univ. Paris-Sud, Faculté de Médecine, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, F-94270, France; AP-HP, Centre de Référence de l'Hypertension Pulmonaire Sévère, Département Hospitalo-Universitaire (DHU) Thorax Innovation (TORINO), Service de Pneumologie, Hôpital de Bicêtre, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, F-94270, France; UMR_S 999, Univ. Paris-Sud, INSERM, Laboratoire D'Excellence (LabEx) en Recherche sur le Médicament et l'Innovation Thérapeutique (LERMIT), Centre Chirurgical Marie Lannelongue, Le Plessis Robinson, F-92350, France.
4
Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia.
5
CHI Créteil, Service de Pneumologie et Pathologie Professionnelle, F-94000, Creteil, France.
6
Inserm, U1168, VIMA: Aging and Chronic Diseases, Epidemiological and Public Health Approaches, F-94807, Villejuif, France; Univ Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, UMR-S 1168, F-78180, Montigny le Bretonneux, France; AP-HP UVSQ, Occupational Health Unit/Population-Based Epidemiological Cohorts Unit, UMS 011, University Hospital of Poincaré, Garches, France. Electronic address: alexis.descatha@inserm.fr.

Abstract

Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chlorinated solvent that has been used widely around the world in the twentieth century for metal degreasing and dry cleaning. Although TCE displays general toxicity and is classified as a human carcinogen, the association between TCE exposure and respiratory disorders are conflicting. In this review we aimed to systematically evaluate the current evidence for the respiratory effects of TCE exposure and the implications for the practicing clinician. There is limited evidence of an increased risk of lung cancer associated with TCE exposure based on animal and human data. However, the effect of other chlorinated solvents and mixed solvent exposure should be further investigated. Limited data are available to support an association between TCE exposure and respiratory tract disorders such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, or rhinitis. The most consistent data is the association of TCE with autoimmune and vascular diseases such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Although recent data are reassuring regarding the absence of an increased lung cancer risk with TCE exposure, clinicians should be aware of other potential respiratory effects of TCE. In particular, occupational exposure to TCE has been linked to less common conditions such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic respiratory diseases; Lung cancer; Occupation; Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease; Solvent; Toxicity

PMID:
29413507
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2017.11.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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