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Prosthet Orthot Int. 2018 Feb;42(1):21-27. doi: 10.1177/0309364617744083.

Investigating the uncanny valley for prosthetic hands.

Author information

1
1 Division of Neuoscience and Experimental Psychology, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK.
2
2 Faculty of Engineering & Science, University of Greenwich, Chatham, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In 1970, Mori hypothesised the existence of an 'uncanny valley', whereby stimuli falling short of being fully human are found to be creepy or eerie.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate how eerie people find different prosthetic hands and whether perceptions of eeriness can be accounted for by categorical ambiguity.

STUDY DESIGN:

Students participated in computerised experiments during which photographic images of hands were presented.

METHODS:

We compared photographs of prosthetic hands pre-selected as more (H+) or less human-like (H-), as well as mechanical and real hands. Participants rated the hands for eeriness and human-likeness, as well as performing a speeded classification (human/non-human) and location judgment (control) task.

RESULTS:

The H- prosthetic hands were rated as more eerie than the H+ prosthetic, mechanical and real hands, and this was unaffected by hand orientation. Participants were significantly slower to categorise the H+ prosthetic hands compared to the H- prosthetic and real hands, which was not due to generally slower responses to the H+ prosthetic hands (control task).

CONCLUSION:

People find prosthetic hands to be eerie, most consistently for less human-like prosthetic hands. This effect is not driven by ambiguity about whether to categorise the prosthetic hand as human or artificial. Clinical relevance More obviously artificial, less-realistic, prosthetic hands consistently generate a sense of eeriness, while more realistic prosthetic hands avoid the uncanny valley, at least on initial viewing. Thus, greater realism in prosthetic design may not always incur a cost, although the role of movement and cutaneous input requires further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

Prosthetic design; affect; perception; prosthetics; uncanny valley

PMID:
29412089
DOI:
10.1177/0309364617744083
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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