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Nat Commun. 2018 Feb 6;9(1):365. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-02753-0.

Closed-loop stimulation of temporal cortex rescues functional networks and improves memory.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 433 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
2
Deparment of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 900 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 900 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas, Southwestern, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX, 75390, USA.
5
Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University Hospital, 1365 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH, 03756, USA.
7
Department of Neurology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
8
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.
9
Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
10
Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 900 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA.
11
Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 433 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. kahana@sas.upenn.edu.

Abstract

Memory failures are frustrating and often the result of ineffective encoding. One approach to improving memory outcomes is through direct modulation of brain activity with electrical stimulation. Previous efforts, however, have reported inconsistent effects when using open-loop stimulation and often target the hippocampus and medial temporal lobes. Here we use a closed-loop system to monitor and decode neural activity from direct brain recordings in humans. We apply targeted stimulation to lateral temporal cortex and report that this stimulation rescues periods of poor memory encoding. This system also improves later recall, revealing that the lateral temporal cortex is a reliable target for memory enhancement. Taken together, our results suggest that such systems may provide a therapeutic approach for treating memory dysfunction.

PMID:
29410414
PMCID:
PMC5802791
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-017-02753-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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