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Resuscitation. 2018 Feb 3;125:70-78. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2018.01.025. [Epub ahead of print]

Gender aspects in cardiopulmonary resuscitation by schoolchildren: A systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Strasse 62, 50937 Cologne, Germany. Electronic address: Simon-Richard.Finke@uk-koeln.de.
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Strasse 62, 50937 Cologne, Germany.
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Strasse 62, 50937 Cologne, Germany; European Resuscitation Council (ERC), Niel, Belgium.

Abstract

AIM:

Bystander CPR-rates are embarrassingly low in some European countries. To increase bystander CPR-rates, many different approaches are used; one of them is training of schoolchildren in CPR. Multiple authors investigated practical and theoretical CPR performance and demonstrated gender differences related to schoolchildren CPR. The objective was to elaborate gender aspects in practical and theoretical CPR-performance from the current literature to better address female and male students.

METHODS:

A systematic search in PubMed-database with different search terms was performed for controlled and uncontrolled prospective investigations. Altogether, n = 2360 articles were identified and checked for aptitude. From n = 97 appropriated articles, n = 24 met the inclusion criteria and were finally included for full review and incorporated in the manuscript.

RESULTS:

Female students demonstrated higher motivation to attend CPR-training (p < 0.001), to respond to cardiac arrest (CA) (p < 0.01), scored higher in a CPR-questionnaire (p < 0.025), revealed better remembrance of the national emergency phone-number (p < 0.05) and showed a higher multiplier effect (p < 0.0001). Male students showed higher confidence in CPR-proficiency (p < 0.05), revealed deeper chest compressions (CC) (p < 0.001; p < 0.0015; p < 0.01), a higher CC-fraction (p < 0.01) and a higher arbitrary cardiac output simulated equivalent index (p < 0.05). Male gender could not be detected to be a predictor for higher tidal volume (p = 0.70; p = 0.0212).

CONCLUSION:

In context of schoolchildren CPR, gender aspects are underestimated. Female students seem to be more motivated to attend CPR-training, reach more people in the role of a multiplier and need to be individually addressed in intensified practical training. Male students achieve a more sufficient chest compression depth and -fraction and could benefit from individual motivation.

KEYWORDS:

Basic life support; Cardiac arrest; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation; Medical education

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