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J Invest Dermatol. 2018 Jul;138(7):1620-1626. doi: 10.1016/j.jid.2018.01.021. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Risks of Melanoma and Other Cancers in Melanoma-Prone Families over 4 Decades.

Author information

1
Human Genetics Program, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Electronic address: tuckerp@mail.nih.gov.
2
Department of Pathology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
3
Information Management Services, Inc, Silver Spring, Maryland.
4
Human Genetics Program, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
5
Westat, Inc, Rockville, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

Since 1976, melanoma-prone families have been followed at the National Cancer Institute to identify etiologic factors for melanoma. We compared risks of melanoma and other cancers in 1,226 members of 56 families followed for up to 4 decades with population rates in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. All families were tested for mutations in CDKN2A and CDK4; 29 were mutation-positive and 27 mutation-negative. We compared rates of invasive melanomas, both first and second, by family mutation status, with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Comparing three calendar periods of the study, risk of first primary melanoma decreased slightly. Risks of melanoma after first examination, however, were approximately one-third the risks prior to the first examination in both mutation-positive and mutation-negative families. Among patients with melanoma, risk of a second melanoma was increased 10-fold in all families; risk was somewhat higher in mutation-positive families. Risks of other second cancers were increased only for pancreatic cancer after melanoma in mutation-positive families. Over 4 decades, prospective risk of melanoma has decreased substantially in both mutation-positive and mutation-negative families, when melanoma has greatly increased in the general population.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

NCI 02-C-0211, ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT00040352.

PMID:
29408205
DOI:
10.1016/j.jid.2018.01.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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