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Transplant Proc. 2018 Jan - Feb;50(1):192-197. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2017.11.032.

Acute Liver Failure due to Amanita phalloides Poisoning: Therapeutic Approach and Outcome.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Transplantcenter, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address: eva.kieslichova@ikem.cz.
2
Department of Hepatogastroenterology, Transplantcenter, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic.
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Transplantcenter, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic.
4
Department of Transplant Surgery, Transplantcenter, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Amanita phalloides poisoning is a potentially fatal cause of acute liver failure. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of initial patients' characteristics and different treatment modalities on the outcome of patients with liver failure caused by Amanita poisoning.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

We retrospectively evaluated 23 patients admitted to our center between July 2007 and August 2016.

RESULTS:

Mean time interval between Amanita phalloides ingestion and the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms was 12.48 ± 9.88 hours and the interval between ingestion and hospital admission 26.26 ± 15.14 hours. The treatment was intiated by oral decontamination using activated charcoal followed by intravenous rehydration and high doses of intravenous N-acetylcysteine and silibinin. Fourteen patients (61%) underwent extracorporeal elimination method. Ten patients had plasmapheresis, 1 patient had hemoperfusion, and 5 patients had fractionated plasma separation and adsorption. Seven patients who met King's College Criteria were listed for urgent liver transplantation; one of them died before transplantation. Six patients underwent liver transplantation; the mean waiting time was 6.5 ± 12.0 days (range, 1-31 days). One patient died 2 months afterward. All 16 patients who did not meet King's College Criteria and received conservative treatment survived.

CONCLUSION:

Our results documented a good prognostic value of standard King's College Criteria for indication of urgent liver transplantation in acute liver failure caused by Amanita phalloides poisoning. Fractionated plasma separation and adsorption may contribute to low mortality on the waiting list. Intensive care and extracorporeal elimination methods seem to be crucial points of the conservative treatment.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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