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Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2018 Feb;56:39-44. doi: 10.1016/j.cimid.2017.12.002. Epub 2017 Dec 24.

Prevalence of Cryptosporidium species isolated from HIV/AIDS patients in southwest of Iran.

Author information

1
Department of Parasitology, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
2
Department of Microbiology, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
3
Department of infectious Diseases, Razi Hospital, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
4
Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the prevalence and species of Cryptosporidium among HIV/AIDS patients in southwest of Iran. Two hundred fifty faecal samples from HIV patients were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts using a conventional coproscopic approach. Such oocysts were detected in 18 (7.2%) out of 250 faecal samples. Genomic DNAs from 250 samples were then subjected to a nested-PCR-RFLP technique targeting different loci of 18S rRNA gene for species identification. Out of 250 samples, 27 (10.8%) were positive for different Cryptosporidium spp; Restriction patterns resulting from the digestion of the nested amplicon with restriction endonucleases VspI and SspI showed that C. parvum (70.38%) was the most prevalent species, followed by C. hominis (25.92%) and C. meleagridis (3.7%), respectively. The mean CD4+ T-cell count was 215 cells/μL. There was a strong association between cryptosporidiosis and CD4+ T-cell count (P = 0.000) with the highest prevalence recorded among patients with CD4+ T-cell count < 200 cells/μL. This confirms that there is a low opportunity for this parasite to get established as the patients CD4+ T-cell count increases. Also HIV infection increased the risk of having Cryptosporidium. Our epidemiological findings are useful for any preventive intervention to control disease diffusion.

KEYWORDS:

18S rRNA gen; Cryptosporidium; HIV; Nested-PCR-RFLP

PMID:
29406282
DOI:
10.1016/j.cimid.2017.12.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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