Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Dev Cell. 2018 Jan 22;44(2):204-216.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2017.12.021.

Feedback from Lateral Organs Controls Shoot Apical Meristem Growth by Modulating Auxin Transport.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and National Center for Plant Gene Research, Beijing 100101, China; College of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.
2
Beijing International Center for Mathematical Research, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China.
3
College of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.
4
Department of Biochemistry, Okayama University of Science, Okayama 700-0005, Japan.
5
Zhou Pei-Yuan Center for Applied Mathematics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
6
Beijing International Center for Mathematical Research, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China; Center for Quantitative Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. Electronic address: zhangl@math.pku.edu.cn.
7
State Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and National Center for Plant Gene Research, Beijing 100101, China; College of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China. Electronic address: yljiao@genetics.ac.cn.

Abstract

Stem cells must balance self-renewal and differentiation; thus, their activities are precisely controlled. In plants, the control circuits that underlie division and differentiation within meristems have been well studied, but those that underlie feedback on meristems from lateral organs remain largely unknown. Here we show that long-distance auxin transport mediates this feedback in a non-cell-autonomous manner. A low-auxin zone is associated with the shoot apical meristem (SAM) organization center, and auxin levels negatively affect SAM size. Using computational model simulations, we show that auxin transport from lateral organs can inhibit auxin transport from the SAM through an auxin transport switch and thus maintain SAM auxin homeostasis and SAM size. Genetic and microsurgical analyses confirmed the model's predictions. In addition, the model explains temporary change in SAM size of yabby mutants. Our study suggests that the canalization-based auxin flux can be widely adapted as a feedback control mechanism in plants.

KEYWORDS:

auxin switch; auxin transport; auxin transport model; cell lineage model; lateral organ; shoot apical meristem; stem cells

PMID:
29401419
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2017.12.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center