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Sleep Med Rev. 2018 Aug;40:151-159. doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2017.12.002. Epub 2017 Dec 20.

Feeling validated yet? A scoping review of the use of consumer-targeted wearable and mobile technology to measure and improve sleep.

Author information

1
Department of Behavioral Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: kgbaron@rush.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois, Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Galter Health Sciences Library, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, USA.
4
Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, USA.
5
Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies, Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, USA.

Abstract

The objectives of this review were to evaluate the use of consumer-targeted wearable and mobile sleep monitoring technology, identify gaps in the literature and determine the potential for use in behavioral interventions. We undertook a scoping review of studies conducted in adult populations using consumer-targeted wearable technology or mobile devices designed to measure and/or improve sleep. After screening for inclusion/exclusion criteria, data were extracted from the articles by two co-authors. Articles included in the search were using wearable or mobile technology to estimate or evaluate sleep, published in English and conducted in adult populations. Our search returned 3897 articles and 43 met our inclusion criteria. Results indicated that the majority of studies focused on validating technology to measure sleep (n = 23) or were observational studies (n = 10). Few studies were used to identify sleep disorders (n = 2), evaluate response to interventions (n = 3) or deliver interventions (n = 5). In conclusion, the use of consumer-targeted wearable and mobile sleep monitoring technology has largely focused on validation of devices and applications compared with polysomnography (PSG) but opportunities exist for observational research and for delivery of behavioral interventions. Multidisciplinary research is needed to determine the uses of these technologies in interventions as well as the use in more diverse populations including sleep disorders and other patient populations.

KEYWORDS:

Mobile devices; Sleep; Sleep apnea; Wearable technology

PMID:
29395985
PMCID:
PMC6008167
DOI:
10.1016/j.smrv.2017.12.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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