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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2018 Feb 12;496(3):840-845. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2018.01.142. Epub 2018 Feb 2.

Perturbations in carotenoid and porphyrin status result in differential photooxidative stress signaling and antioxidant responses.

Author information

1
School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, BK21 Plus KNU Creative BioResearch Group, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, South Korea.
2
School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, BK21 Plus KNU Creative BioResearch Group, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, South Korea. Electronic address: sjung@knu.ac.kr.

Abstract

We examined differential photooxidative stress signaling and antioxidant responses in rice plants treated with norflurazon (NF) and oxyfluorfen (OF), which are inhibitors of carotenoid and porphyrin biosynthesis, respectively. Plants treated with OF markedly increased levels of cellular leakage and malondialdehyde, compared with NF-treated plants, showing that OF plants suffered greater oxidative damage with respect to membrane integrity. The enhanced production of H2O2 in response to OF, but not NF, indicates the important role of H2O2 in activation of photooxidative stress signaling in OF plants. In response to NF and OF, the increased levels of free salicylic acid as well as maintenance of the redox ratio of ascorbate and glutathione pools to a certain level are considered to be crucial factors in the protection against photooxidation. Plants treated with OF greatly up-regulated catalase (CAT) activity and Cat transcript levels, compared with NF-treated plants. Interestingly, NF plants showed no noticeable increase in oxidative metabolism, although they did show considerable increases in ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and peroxidase activities and transcript levels of APX, as in OF plants. Our results suggest that perturbations in carotenoid and porphyrin status by NF and OF can be sensed by differential photooxidative stress signaling, such as that involving H2O2, redox state of ascorbate and glutathione, and salicylic acid, which may be responsible for at least part of the induction of ROS-scavenging enzymes.

KEYWORDS:

Norflurazon; Oxyfluorfen; Photooxidative stress; ROS-scavenging enzyme; Redox metabolism

PMID:
29395084
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2018.01.142
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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