Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Stem Cell. 2018 Feb 1;22(2):221-234.e8. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2018.01.003.

Adult Neurogenesis Is Sustained by Symmetric Self-Renewal and Differentiation.

Author information

1
Eli and Edythe Broad Institute for Stem Cell Research and Regeneration Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
2
Laboratory of Comparative Neurobiology, Instituto Cavanilles, Universidad de Valencia, CIBERNED, Valencia 46980, Spain.
3
Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA; Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.
4
Eli and Edythe Broad Institute for Stem Cell Research and Regeneration Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Electronic address: alvarezbuyllaa@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Somatic stem cells have been identified in multiple adult tissues. Whether self-renewal occurs symmetrically or asymmetrically is key to understanding long-term stem cell maintenance and generation of progeny for cell replacement. In the adult mouse brain, neural stem cells (NSCs) (B1 cells) are retained in the walls of the lateral ventricles (ventricular-subventricular zone [V-SVZ]). The mechanism of B1 cell retention into adulthood for lifelong neurogenesis is unknown. Using multiple clonal labeling techniques, we show that the vast majority of B1 cells divide symmetrically. Whereas 20%-30% symmetrically self-renew and can remain in the niche for several months before generating neurons, 70%-80% undergo consuming divisions generating progeny, resulting in the depletion of B1 cells over time. This cellular mechanism decouples self-renewal from the generation of progeny. Limited rounds of symmetric self-renewal and consuming symmetric differentiation divisions can explain the levels of neurogenesis observed throughout life.

KEYWORDS:

B1 cells; aging; division mode; lineage tracing; neural stem cells; neurogenesis; self-renewal; symmetric division; time-lapse imaging; ventricular-subventricular zone

Comment in

PMID:
29395056
PMCID:
PMC5802882
DOI:
10.1016/j.stem.2018.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center