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Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 1;8(1):2055. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-20662-0.

Superficial Slow Rhythms Integrate Cortical Processing in Humans.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02114, USA. milan.n.halgren@gmail.com.
2
Epilepsy Centrum, National Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Budapest, Hungary.
3
Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Research Center for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Science, Budapest, Hungary.
4
Péter Pázmány Catholic University, Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Budapest, Hungary.
5
Departments of Neurosurgery, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
6
Department of Functional Neurosurgery, National Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Budapest, Hungary.
7
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA.
8
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.
9
Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
10
Departments of Neurosciences and Radiology, Center for Human Brain Activity Mapping, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

Abstract

The neocortex is composed of six anatomically and physiologically specialized layers. It has been proposed that integration of activity across cortical areas is mediated anatomically by associative connections terminating in superficial layers, and physiologically by slow cortical rhythms. However, the means through which neocortical anatomy and physiology interact to coordinate neural activity remains obscure. Using laminar microelectrode arrays in 19 human participants, we found that most EEG activity is below 10-Hz (delta/theta) and generated by superficial cortical layers during both wakefulness and sleep. Cortical surface grid, grid-laminar, and dual-laminar recordings demonstrate that these slow rhythms are synchronous within upper layers across broad cortical areas. The phase of this superficial slow activity is reset by infrequent stimuli and coupled to the amplitude of faster oscillations and neuronal firing across all layers. These findings support a primary role of superficial slow rhythms in generating the EEG and integrating cortical activity.

PMID:
29391596
PMCID:
PMC5794750
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-20662-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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