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Transl Psychiatry. 2018 Feb 2;8(1):39. doi: 10.1038/s41398-017-0079-1.

Genome-wide analysis of self-reported risk-taking behaviour and cross-disorder genetic correlations in the UK Biobank cohort.

Author information

1
Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. rona.strawbridge@glasgow.ac.uk.
2
Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. rona.strawbridge@glasgow.ac.uk.
3
Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
5
Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA.
7
Transmontane Analytics, Tuscon, AZ, USA.
8
School of Life Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
9
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.

Abstract

Risk-taking behaviour is a key component of several psychiatric disorders and could influence lifestyle choices such as smoking, alcohol use, and diet. As a phenotype, risk-taking behaviour therefore fits within a Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) approach, whereby identifying genetic determinants of this trait has the potential to improve our understanding across different psychiatric disorders. Here we report a genome-wide association study in 116,255 UK Biobank participants who responded yes/no to the question "Would you consider yourself a risk taker?" Risk takers (compared with controls) were more likely to be men, smokers, and have a history of psychiatric disorder. Genetic loci associated with risk-taking behaviour were identified on chromosomes 3 (rs13084531) and 6 (rs9379971). The effects of both lead SNPs were comparable between men and women. The chromosome 3 locus highlights CADM2, previously implicated in cognitive and executive functions, but the chromosome 6 locus is challenging to interpret due to the complexity of the HLA region. Risk-taking behaviour shared significant genetic risk with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as with smoking and total obesity. Despite being based on only a single question, this study furthers our understanding of the biology of risk-taking behaviour, a trait that has a major impact on a range of common physical and mental health disorders.

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