Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Food Res Int. 2018 Jan;103:361-370. doi: 10.1016/j.foodres.2017.10.047. Epub 2017 Oct 29.

Iron and zinc bioaccessibility of fermented maize, sorghum and millets from five locations in Zimbabwe.

Author information

1
Department of Industrial Biological Sciences, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Graaf Karel de Goedelaan 5, 8500 Kortrijk, Belgium; Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Zimbabwe, P.O. Box MP 167, Mt Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe; Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ghent University, Ledeganckstraat 35, 9000 Gent, Belgium.
2
Department of Industrial Biological Sciences, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Graaf Karel de Goedelaan 5, 8500 Kortrijk, Belgium.
3
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Zimbabwe, P.O. Box MP 167, Mt Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe.
4
Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ghent University, Ledeganckstraat 35, 9000 Gent, Belgium.
5
Department of Industrial Biological Sciences, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Graaf Karel de Goedelaan 5, 8500 Kortrijk, Belgium. Electronic address: katleen.raes@ugent.be.

Abstract

The present study is an evaluation of iron and zinc bioaccessibility of fermented maize, sorghum, pearl millet and finger millet from five different locations in Zimbabwe. Iron and zinc contents ranged between 3.22 and 49.7 and 1.25-4.39mg/100gdm, respectively. Fermentation caused a reduction of between 20 and 88% of phytic acid (PA) while a general increase in soluble phenolic compounds (PC) and a decrease of the bound (PC) was observed. Bioaccessibility of iron and zinc ranged between 2.77 and 26.1% and 0.45-12.8%, respectively. The contribution of the fermented cereals towards iron and zinc absolute requirements ranged between 25 and 411% and 0.5-23% with higher contribution of iron coming from cereals that were contaminated with extrinsic iron. Populations subsisting on cereals could be more at risk of zinc rather than iron deficiency.

KEYWORDS:

Bioaccessibility; Cereals; Iron; Phenolic compounds; Phytic acid; Zinc

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center