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Eur Radiol. 2018 Jan 30. doi: 10.1007/s00330-017-5271-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Contrast-enhanced cadaver-specific computed tomography in gross anatomy teaching.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. d.paech@dkfz.de.
2
Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. d.paech@dkfz.de.
3
Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
5
Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To establish contrast-enhanced (CE) cadaver-specific post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in first-year gross anatomy teaching and quantitatively evaluate its learning benefit.

METHODS:

132 first-year medical students were included in this IRB-approved study and randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=59) provided with continuous access to CE and non-enhanced (NE) cadaver-specific PMCT-scans during the first-semester gross anatomy course, and a control group (n=73) that had only NE cadaver-specific PMCT data available. Four multiple-choice tests were carried out (15 questions each) subsequent to completion of the corresponding anatomy module: Head and neck anatomy, extremities, thorax, and abdomen. Median test results were compared in each module between the groups using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Additionally, participants of the intervention group answered a 15-item feedback-questionnaire.

RESULTS:

The intervention group achieved significantly higher test scores in head and neck anatomy (median=12.0, IQR=10.0-13.0) versus the control group (median=10.5, IQR=9.0-12.0) (p<0.01). There were no significant differences in the comparison of other modules. CEPMCT was highly appreciated by undergraduate medical students.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incorporation of contrast-enhanced cadaver-specific PMCT-scans in gross anatomy teaching was proven to be feasible in the framework of the medical curriculum and significantly improved the students' learning performance in head and neck anatomy.

KEY POINTS:

• Cadaver-specific contrast-enhanced post-mortem CT (CEPMCT) is feasible in the medical curriculum. • CEPMCT yields significantly improved learning performance in head and neck anatomy (p<0.01). • CEPMCT is highly appreciated by medical students and used in tutor- or self-guided modes.

KEYWORDS:

Anatomy; Anatomy, cross-sectional; Computed tomography angiography; Medical education; Post-mortem examination

PMID:
29383525
DOI:
10.1007/s00330-017-5271-4
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