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West J Emerg Med. 2018 Jan;19(1):112-120. doi: 10.5811/westjem.2017.11.36524. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

A Randomized Trial of SMART Goal Enhanced Debriefing after Simulation to Promote Educational Actions.

Author information

1
Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Brooklyn, New York.
2
Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Spectrum Health Emergency Medicine Residency, Grand Rapids, Michigan.
3
University of Vermont Medical Center, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Surgery, Burlington, Vermont.
4
Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan.
5
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.

Abstract

Introduction:

Goal setting is used in education to promote learning and performance. Debriefing after clinical scenario-based simulation is a well-established practice that provides learners a defined structure to review and improve performance. Our objective was to integrate formal learning goal generation, using the SMART framework (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time-bound), into standard debriefing processes (i.e., "SMART Goal Enhanced Debriefing") and subsequently measure the impact on the development of learning goals and execution of educational actions.

Methods:

This was a prospective multicenter randomized controlled study of 80 emergency medicine residents at three academic hospitals comparing the effectiveness of SMART Goal Enhanced Debriefing to a standard debriefing. Residents were block randomized on a rolling basis following a simulation case. SMART Goal Enhanced Debriefing included five minutes of formal instruction on the development of SMART learning goals during the summary/application phase of the debrief. Outcome measures included the number of recalled learning goals, self-reported executed educational actions, and quality of each learning goal and educational action after a two-week follow-up period.

Results:

The mean number of reported learning goals was similar in the standard debriefing group (mean 2.05 goals, SD 1.13, n=37 residents), and in the SMART Goal Enhanced Debriefing group (mean 1.93, SD 0.96, n=43), with no difference in learning goal quality. Residents receiving SMART Goal Enhanced Debriefing completed more educational actions on average (Control group actions completed 0.97 (SD 0.87), SMART debrief group 1.44 (SD 1.03) p=0.03).

Conclusion:

The number and quality of learning goals reported by residents was not improved as a result of SMART Goal Enhanced Debriefing. Residents did, however, execute more educational actions, which is consistent with the overarching intent of any educational intervention.

PMID:
29383065
PMCID:
PMC5785177
DOI:
10.5811/westjem.2017.11.36524
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Conflicts of Interest: By the WestJEM article submission agreement, all authors are required to disclose all affiliations, funding sources and financial or management relationships that could be perceived as potential sources of bias. No author has professional or financial relationships with any companies that are relevant to this study. There are no conflicts of interest or sources of funding to declare.

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