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J Am Heart Assoc. 2018 Jan 30;7(3). pii: e007426. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.117.007426.

Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy and Offspring Cardiometabolic Health at Midchildhood: Project Viva Findings.

Author information

1
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA.
2
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT.
3
Diabetes Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.
4
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA emily_oken@hphc.org.
5
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exposure to preeclampsia or gestational hypertension is associated with higher offspring systolic blood pressure (SBP), but less is known about associations with other cardiometabolic risk markers.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We studied 1097 children from the Project Viva cohort born 1999-2002. Exposures were preeclampsia or gestational hypertension and mean maternal SBP in each trimester from prenatal records. Outcomes were research measures in midchildhood (mean 8.0 years) of SBP, overall adiposity, and a global cardiometabolic risk score comprising measures of SBP, waist circumference, glycemia, and lipids. We conducted linear regression analyses adjusted for maternal characteristics and offspring sex and age. In adjusted models, maternal preeclampsia or gestational hypertension (n=98, 9.1%) versus normal blood pressure was associated with slightly higher offspring SBP z-score (0.15 units; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.03, 0.32) but otherwise predicted better cardiometabolic health markers including metabolic risk z-score (-0.23 units; -95% CI 0.44, -0.03) and several of its components as well as lower body mass index z-score (-0.27 units; 95% CI -0.48, -0.06) and lower fat mass index (-0.91 kg/m2; 95% CI -1.35, -0.47). Similarly, higher mean third-trimester maternal SBP was associated with higher offspring SBP z-score (0.09 units per 10 mm Hg; 95% CI 0.02, 0.16) and lower overall and central adiposity but not with biomarkers of metabolic risk. Results for second-trimester SBP were generally similar. First-trimester blood pressure was associated with higher offspring blood pressure but not with other outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher maternal late-pregnancy SBP and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were associated with higher offspring SBP but otherwise better cardiometabolic health.

KEYWORDS:

high blood pressure; hypertension; preeclampsia/pregnancy

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