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BMC Biol. 2018 Jan 30;16(1):18. doi: 10.1186/s12915-018-0484-9.

Stress-induced reproductive arrest in Drosophila occurs through ETH deficiency-mediated suppression of oogenesis and ovulation.

Author information

1
Departments of Entomology and Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.
2
Graduate Program in Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.
3
Departments of Entomology and Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA. michael.adams@ucr.edu.
4
Graduate Program in Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA. michael.adams@ucr.edu.
5
Graduate Program in Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA. michael.adams@ucr.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Environmental stressors induce changes in endocrine state, leading to energy re-allocation from reproduction to survival. Female Drosophila melanogaster respond to thermal and nutrient stressors by arresting egg production through elevation of the steroid hormone ecdysone. However, the mechanisms through which this reproductive arrest occurs are not well understood.

RESULTS:

Here we report that stress-induced elevation of ecdysone is accompanied by decreased levels of ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH). Depressed levels of circulating ETH lead to attenuated activity of its targets, including juvenile hormone-producing corpus allatum and, as we describe here for the first time, octopaminergic neurons of the oviduct. Elevation of steroid thereby results in arrested oogenesis, reduced octopaminergic input to the reproductive tract, and consequent suppression of ovulation. ETH mitigates heat or nutritional stress-induced attenuation of fecundity, which suggests that its deficiency is critical to reproductive adaptability.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings indicate that, as a dual regulator of octopamine and juvenile hormone release, ETH provides a link between stress-induced elevation of ecdysone levels and consequent reduction in fecundity.

KEYWORDS:

Ecdysis triggering hormone; Ecdysone; Endocrine; Heat and nutrient stress; Juvenile hormone; Liberin; Octopamine

PMID:
29382341
PMCID:
PMC5791332
DOI:
10.1186/s12915-018-0484-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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