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Nutrients. 2018 Jan 27;10(2). pii: E133. doi: 10.3390/nu10020133.

Association of Circulating Vitamin E (α- and γ-Tocopherol) Levels with Gallstone Disease.

Author information

1
Institute of Epidemiology, University of Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. sabina.waniek@epi.uni-kiel.de.
2
Institute of Epidemiology, University of Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. romina.digiuseppe@epi.uni-kiel.de.
3
Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, University of Kiel, 24118 Kiel, Germany. tuba.esatbeyoglu@mri.bund.de.
4
Institute of Epidemiology, University of Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. ilka.ratjen@epi.uni-kiel.de.
5
Institute of Epidemiology, University of Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. janna.enderle@epi.uni-kiel.de.
6
Institute of Epidemiology, University of Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. jacobs@popgen.de.
7
Biobank PopGen, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. jacobs@popgen.de.
8
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Bonn, 53113 Bonn, Germany. noethlings@uni-bonn.de.
9
Institute of Epidemiology, University of Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. mkoch@hsph.harvard.edu.
10
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. mkoch@hsph.harvard.edu.
11
Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Center (DDZ) at Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany. sabrina.schlesinger@DDZ.uni-duesseldorf.de.
12
Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, University of Kiel, 24118 Kiel, Germany. rimbach@foodsci.uni-kiel.de.
13
Institute of Epidemiology, University of Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. wolfgang.lieb@epi.uni-kiel.de.
14
Biobank PopGen, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. wolfgang.lieb@epi.uni-kiel.de.

Abstract

In addition to well-established risk factors like older age, female gender, and adiposity, oxidative stress may play a role in the pathophysiology of gallstone disease. Since vitamin E exerts important anti-oxidative functions, we hypothesized that circulating vitamin E levels might be inversely associated with prevalence of gallstone disease. In a cross-sectional study, we measured plasma levels of α- and γ-tocopherol using high performance liquid chromatography in a community-based sample (582 individuals; median age 62 years; 38.5% women). Gallstone disease status was assessed by ultrasound. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models were used to estimate the association of circulating α- and γ-tocopherol/cholesterol ratio levels with prevalent gallstone disease. Lower probabilities of having gallstone disease were observed in the top (compared to the bottom) tertile of the plasma α-tocopherol/cholesterol ratio in multivariable-adjusted models (OR (Odds Ratio): 0.31; 95% CI (Confidence Interval): 0.13-0.76). A lower probability of having gallstone disease was also observed for the γ-tocopherol/cholesterol ratio, though the association did not reach statistical significance (OR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.35-1.69 for 3rd vs 1st tertile). In conclusion, our observations are consistent with the concept that higher vitamin E levels might protect from gallstone disease, a premise that needs to be further addressed in longitudinal studies.

KEYWORDS:

gallstone disease; vitamin E; α- and γ-tocopherol

PMID:
29382041
PMCID:
PMC5852709
DOI:
10.3390/nu10020133
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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