Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuroscience. 2018 Mar 15;374:33-48. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2018.01.029. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Differential Processing by Two Olfactory Subsystems in the Honeybee Brain.

Author information

1
Evolution, Genomes, Behavior and Ecology, CNRS, Univ Paris-Sud, IRD, Université Paris Saclay, 1 avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale, Centre de Biologie Intégrative (CBI), Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France.
2
Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale, Centre de Biologie Intégrative (CBI), Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France.
3
Evolution, Genomes, Behavior and Ecology, CNRS, Univ Paris-Sud, IRD, Université Paris Saclay, 1 avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette, France. Electronic address: sandoz@egce.cnrs-gif.fr.

Abstract

Among insects, Hymenoptera present a striking olfactory system with a clear neural dichotomy from the periphery to higher order centers, based on two main tracts of second-order (projection) neurons: the medial and lateral antennal lobe tracts (m-ALT and l-ALT). Despite substantial work on this dual pathway, its exact function is yet unclear. Here, we ask how attributes of odor quality and odor quantity are represented in the projection neurons (PNs) of the two pathways. Using in vivo calcium imaging, we compared the responses of m-ALT and l-ALT PNs of the honey bee Apis mellifera to a panel of 16 aliphatic odorants, and to three chosen odorants at eight concentrations. The results show that each pathway conveys differential information about odorants' chemical features or concentration to higher order centers. While the l-ALT primarily conveys information about odorants' chain length, the m-ALT informs about odorants' functional group. Furthermore, each tract can only predict chemical distances or bees' behavioral responses for odorants that differ according to its main feature, chain length or functional group. Generally l-ALT neurons displayed more graded dose-response relationships than m-ALT neurons, with a correspondingly smoother progression of inter-odor distances with increasing concentration. Comparison of these results with previous data recorded at AL input reveals differential processing by local networks within the two pathways. These results support the existence of parallel processing of odorant features in the insect brain.

KEYWORDS:

antennal lobe; insect; optical imaging; parallel processing; projection neurons

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center