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Dig Liver Dis. 2018 Apr;50(4):389-395. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2017.12.014. Epub 2017 Dec 26.

Effect of longitudinal changes of body fat on the incidence and regression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Healthcare Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, USA. Electronic address: messmd@chol.com.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Healthcare Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

AIMS:

To investigate the longitudinal association between changes in body fat amount and the incidence and regression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

METHODS:

We performed a cohort study of 2017 subjects without liver disease or significant alcohol consumption from 2007 to 2008 and participated in a voluntary follow-up between 2011 and 2013. Of the 2017 subjects, we enrolled 956 (47.4%) subjects who had available abdominal fat data in both 2007-2008 and 2011-2013. NAFLD was diagnosed on the basis of ultrasonographic findings. Adipose tissue area was evaluated by computed tomography.

RESULTS:

We observed 145 incident cases of NAFLD (22.6% of 642), and 79 subjects experienced a regression of NAFLD (25.2% of 314) during a median of 4.64 years. An increasing change in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) area was associated with a higher incidence of NAFLD (highest tertile vs. lowest tertile of VAT hazard ratio [HR] 2.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56-3.85, P for trend <0.001) in the multivariable analysis. An increasing change in VAT area was inversely associated with the regression of NAFLD (highest tertile vs. lowest tertile of VAT HR 0.40, 95% CI 0.20-0.80, P for trend = 0.008).

CONCLUSIONS:

An increasing change in VAT area was longitudinally associated with a higher risk of incident NAFLD and inversely associated with the regression of NAFLD.

KEYWORDS:

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; Obesity; Steatosis; Visceral; Visceral adipose tissue

PMID:
29373238
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2017.12.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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