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Int Orthop. 2018 Mar;42(3):625-630. doi: 10.1007/s00264-018-3777-2. Epub 2018 Jan 25.

Traumatic fractures as a result of motor vehicle collisions in children and adolescents.

Wang H1,2,3,4, Zhou Y5, Liu J6, Ou L7, Zhao Y8, Han J8, Xiang L6.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopedics, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Area Command of Chinese PLA, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110016, China. cplawhw@163.com.
2
State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110016, China. cplawhw@163.com.
3
State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074, China. cplawhw@163.com.
4
State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400038, China. cplawhw@163.com.
5
Department of Orthopedics, Xinqiao Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400037, China.
6
Department of Orthopedics, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Area Command of Chinese PLA, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110016, China.
7
Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400038, China.
8
State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110016, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We investigated the incidence and pattern of traumatic fractures resulting from motor vehicle collisions in a population of children and adolescents (≤18 years old) and to determine the risk factors for nerve injury.

METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed 734 patients admitted to our university-affiliated hospitals from 2001 to 2010.

RESULTS:

This study enrolled 498 male (67.8%) and 236 female (32.2%) patients aged 10.9 ± 5.3 years old. The most common injuries were to pedestrians, and the most common fracture sites (438, 59.7%) were to lower extremities (n = 441, 60.0%). A total of 201 (27.4%) patients experienced a nerve injury. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that age (P = 0.014), lower-extremity (P = 0.000), craniofacial (P = 0.000) and spinal (P = 0.000) fractures were risk factors for nerve injury. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that craniofacial [odds ratio (OR) = 9.003, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.159-15.711, P = 0.000)] and spinal (experiencedOR = 10.141, 95% CI: 4.649-22.121, P = 0.011) fractures were independent risk factors for nerve injury.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients in the 15- to 18-years old group and drivers had the largest sex ratio and highest frequencies of both nerve injury and early complications. Craniofacial and spinal fractures were independent risk factors for nerve injury. It is therefore important to focus on these risk factors to determine the presence of a nerve injury so that early, timely diagnosis and targeted treatment can be provided.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Children; Fracture; Motor vehicle collisions; Nerve injury

PMID:
29372269
DOI:
10.1007/s00264-018-3777-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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