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Science. 2018 Jan 26;359(6374). pii: eaan2788. doi: 10.1126/science.aan2788.

Spermidine in health and disease.

Madeo F1,2, Eisenberg T3,2, Pietrocola F4,5,6,7,8, Kroemer G9,5,6,7,8,10,11.

Author information

1
Institute of Molecular Biosciences, NAWI Graz, University of Graz, Graz, Austria. frank.madeo@uni-graz.at kroemer@orange.fr.
2
BioTechMed Graz, Graz, Austria.
3
Institute of Molecular Biosciences, NAWI Graz, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
4
Equipe 11 Labellisée Ligue Contre le Cancer, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
5
Cell Biology and Metabolomics Platforms, Gustave Roussy Comprehensive Cancer Center, Villejuif, France.
6
INSERM, U1138, Paris, France.
7
University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.
8
University Pierre and Marie Curie, Paris, France.
9
Equipe 11 Labellisée Ligue Contre le Cancer, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France. frank.madeo@uni-graz.at kroemer@orange.fr.
10
Pôle de Biologie, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France.
11
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Interventions that delay aging and protect from age-associated disease are slowly approaching clinical implementation. Such interventions include caloric restriction mimetics, which are defined as agents that mimic the beneficial effects of dietary restriction while limiting its detrimental effects. One such agent, the natural polyamine spermidine, has prominent cardioprotective and neuroprotective effects and stimulates anticancer immunosurveillance in rodent models. Moreover, dietary polyamine uptake correlates with reduced cardiovascular and cancer-related mortality in human epidemiological studies. Spermidine preserves mitochondrial function, exhibits anti-inflammatory properties, and prevents stem cell senescence. Mechanistically, it shares the molecular pathways engaged by other caloric restriction mimetics: It induces protein deacetylation and depends on functional autophagy. Because spermidine is already present in daily human nutrition, clinical trials aiming at increasing the uptake of this polyamine appear feasible.

PMID:
29371440
DOI:
10.1126/science.aan2788
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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