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Rev Med Inst Mex Seguro Soc. 2018 Jan-Feb;56(1):112-115.

[Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Incidental finding in a renal donor, 10 years after the evolution in recipient].

[Article in Spanish; Abstract available in Spanish from the publisher]

Author information

1
Servicio de Nefrología, Hospital General de Zona No. 8, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Ciudad de México, México juancarloshhernandezrivera@hotmail.com.
2
Servicio de Nefrología, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Médico Nacional La Raza, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Ciudad de México, México.
3
Jefatura del Servicio de Nefrología, Hospital General Regional No. 25, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Ciudad de México, México.
4
Servicio de Nefrología, Hospital General Regional No. 1, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Tijuana, Baja California, México.
5
Servicio de Urgencias, Hospital Regional "Licenciado Adolfo López Mateos", Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado, Ciudad de México, México.
6
Jefatura de la Unidad de Investigación Médica en Enfermedades Nefrológicas, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Ciudad de México, México.

Abstract

in English, Spanish

BACKGROUND:

The incidence of cancer in transplant recipients is higher than in the general population. Cutaneous and lymphoproliferative tumors are the primary neoplasms that will develop these patients. Little is known about the transmission of cancer in organ and tissue donation; it has been described that neoplasms can be transmitted to immunosuppressed patients when donor organs with neoplasms are inadvertently transplanted.

CASE REPORT:

Patient of 29 years of age who underwent kidney transplantation 10 years ago. The kidney was donated by his father, who was 58 years. An incidental finding in the bench surgery showed a tumor of about 1 cm in the donated kidney. The intraoperative histopathological study showed no alterations, but two weeks after the surgery it was diagnosed follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma grade II retroperitoneal. Subsequently, the donor underwent radiotherapy, since it was documented local growth of lymph. The recipient was monitored, given that the complete tumor was removed free of neoplasia in all its edges. 10 years after the transplantation, both donor and recipient are free of neoplastic disease and the latter has a stable renal function.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the presence of an incidental neoplasm from a renal donor, the possibility of donation must be reconsidered in the face of an in situ neoplasm. We suggest detailed protocol prior to transplant and a thorough exploration in the surgical event in order to detect tumors with intraoperative study.

KEYWORDS:

Immunosuppression; Non-Hodgkin lymphoma; Renal transplantation

PMID:
29368904
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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