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Int Braz J Urol. 2018 Mar-Apr;44(2):378-383. doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2017.0434.

Risk factors for urinary tract infection in children with urinary urgency.

Author information

1
Centro Pediátrico de Distúrbios Urinários (CEDIMI), Salvador, BA, Brasil.
2
Departamento de Urologia, Unidade de Urologia Pediátrica, Faculdade de Medicina e Saúde Pública da Bahia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA, Brasil.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To identify which independent variable would be strong predictor of febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in children and adolescents with overactive bladder.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A search was made of the institute's database for all patients diagnosed with overactive bladder over the preceding four years. Children and adolescents under 18 years of age with overactive bladder and no neurological or anatomical alterations of the lower urinary tract were included in the study. The independent variables were: sex, age, ethnicity (Brazilians of African descendence/others), the presence of urinary urgency, daytime incontinence, enuresis, frequent urination, infrequent voiding (≤3 voids/day), nocturia, holding maneuvers, straining to void, intermittent urinary flow, constipation and encopresis. An analysis was conducted to identify patients with febrile UTI and subsequently determine predictors of this condition. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed.

RESULTS:

Overall, 326 patients (214 girls/112 boys) were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 7.7±3.19 years (± standard deviation). The incidence of febrile UTI was 39.2%. Being female and infrequent voiding were factors significantly associated with febrile UTI, both in the univariate and multivariate analyses.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results show that being female and infrequent voiding constituted significant risk factors for a diagnosis of febrile UTI in these children.

KEYWORDS:

Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms; Urinary Bladder, Overactive; Urinary Tract Infections

PMID:
29368878
PMCID:
PMC6050565
DOI:
10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2017.0434
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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