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Brain Imaging Behav. 2018 Dec;12(6):1596-1606. doi: 10.1007/s11682-017-9821-9.

Comparison of brain activity between motor imagery and mental rotation of the hand tasks: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

Author information

1
Department of Cognitive Behavioral Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan.
2
Department of Molecular Imaging and Theranostics, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, QST, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba, 263-8555, Japan.
3
Research Center for Child Mental Development, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan.
4
National Institute of Radiological Sciences, QST, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba, 263-8555, Japan.
5
Department of Molecular Imaging and Theranostics, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, QST, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba, 263-8555, Japan. obata.takayuki@qst.go.jp.
6
Research Center for Child Mental Development, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan. obata.takayuki@qst.go.jp.
7
Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan. obata.takayuki@qst.go.jp.

Abstract

Motor imagery (MI) has been considered effective in learning and practicing movements in many fields. However, when evaluating the effectiveness of this technique, the examiner has no way of assessing the participant's motor imagery process. As an alternative, we have been exploring a mental body-part rotation task, in which the examiner can estimate the participant's motivation and ability to sustain attention through the scored results. In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible application of a mental rotation (MRot) task and used fMRI to compare the brain activity during the MRot task with that during an MI task in healthy volunteers. Increased blood oxygenation level-dependent signals were observed bilaterally in the premotor areas and supplementary motor area during performance of both MI and MRot tasks. Our findings suggest that MRot could be an alternative to MI.

PMID:
29368208
PMCID:
PMC6302056
DOI:
10.1007/s11682-017-9821-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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