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Anaesthesist. 2018 Feb;67(2):83-92. doi: 10.1007/s00101-018-0406-9.

[Cancer patients in operative intensive care medicine].

[Article in German]
Annecke T1,2, Hohn A3,4, Böll B5,4,6, Kochanek M5,4,6.

Author information

1
Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Operative Intensivmedizin, Uniklinik Köln, Kerpener Straße 62, 50937, Köln, Deutschland. thorsten.annecke@uk-koeln.de.
2
Centrum für Integrierte Onkologie (CIO) Köln Bonn, Universitätsklinikum Köln, Köln, Deutschland. thorsten.annecke@uk-koeln.de.
3
Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Operative Intensivmedizin, Uniklinik Köln, Kerpener Straße 62, 50937, Köln, Deutschland.
4
Centrum für Integrierte Onkologie (CIO) Köln Bonn, Universitätsklinikum Köln, Köln, Deutschland.
5
Medizinische Klinik I, Uniklinik Köln, Köln, Deutschland.
6
Arbeitsgruppe Intensive Care in Hematologic and Oncologic Patients (iCHOP), DGHO/DGIIN, Berlin, Deutschland.

Abstract

Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. New targeted and individualized therapies and drugs provide a survival benefit for an increasing number of patients, but can also cause severe side effects. An increasing number of oncology patients are admitted to intensive care units (ICU) because of cancer-related complications or treatment-associated side effects. Postoperative care, respiratory distress and sepsis are the leading causes for admission. Tumor mass syndromes and tumor lysis may require urgent treatment. Traditional anticancer chemotherapy is associated with infections and immunosuppression. Newer agents are generally well-tolerated and side effects are mild or moderate, but overwhelming inflammation and autoimmunity can also occur. Cellular treatment, such as with chimeric antigen receptor modified T‑cells, monoclonal and bispecific antibodies targeting immune effectors and tumor cells are associated with cytokine release syndrome (CRS) with hypotension, skin reactions and fever. It is related to excessively high levels of inflammatory cytokines. Immune checkpoint inhibitors can lead to immune-related adverse events (IRAEs), such as colitis and endocrine disorders. Noninfectious respiratory complications, such as pneumonitis can also occur. Recent studies revealed that short-term and medium-term survival of cancer patients is better than previously expected. In this review article we summarize diagnostic and treatment strategies for common life-threatening complications and emergencies requiring ICU admission. Furthermore, strategies for rational admission policies are presented.

KEYWORDS:

Anesthesiology; Emergency medicine; Hematology; Intensive care; Neutropenia; Oncology

PMID:
29368008
DOI:
10.1007/s00101-018-0406-9

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