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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Aug;72(8):1093-1102. doi: 10.1038/s41430-018-0086-1. Epub 2018 Jan 24.

Associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, body composition and metabolic profiles in young women.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
2
Institute for Health and Aging Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
3
Infection and Immunity Theme, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
4
Women's Centre for Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
6
Diabetes Service, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
7
Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. jdwark@unimelb.edu.au.
8
Bone and Mineral Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia. jdwark@unimelb.edu.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity globally. Results from previous studies are inconsistent and it remains unclear whether low-serum 25 OHD levels are associated with an increased risk of CVD. These associations have been little studied in young women. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between serum 25 OHD and obesity, body composition, metabolic profiles and blood pressure in young women.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

Women aged 16-25 years living in Victoria, Australia, were recruited through Facebook advertising in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed an online survey and attended a site visit in a fasted state, where parameters, including blood pressure, anthropometry, metabolic profiles, serum 25 OHD levels and body composition (using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) were measured.

RESULTS:

A total of 557 participants were recruited into this study. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that after adjusting for visceral fat, season, smoking, physical activity, age, alcohol intake, oral contraceptive use, country of birth, taking multivitamins and taking vitamin D supplement, a 10 nmol/L increase in 25 OHD levels was associated with 0.65% greater HDL levels (p = 0.016) and 0.92% greater triglyceride levels (p = 0.003). It was also associated with 0.48% lower BMI (p < 0.001), 0.50% lower total fat percentage (p < 0.001), 0.09% lower visceral fat percentage (p < 0.001), 0.14% lower visceral fat to total fat ratio (p < 0.001) and 0.36% lower trunk fat to total fat ratio (p < 0.001), after adjustment for season, smoking, physical activity, age, alcohol intake, oral contraceptive use, country of birth, taking multivitamins and taking vitamin D supplements. Although these associations were statistically significant, they were very small in magnitude and of uncertain clinical significance.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings may help to explain an association between 25 OHD levels and CVD risk factors through associations with HDL, BMI, total body and visceral fat mass. Possible underlying mechanisms warrant further investigation.

PMID:
29367732
DOI:
10.1038/s41430-018-0086-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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