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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Oct;72(10):1358-1363. doi: 10.1038/s41430-017-0064-z. Epub 2018 Jan 25.

Vitamin D status in irritable bowel syndrome and the impact of supplementation on symptoms: what do we know and what do we need to know?

Author information

1
Molecular Gastroenterology Research Group, Academic Unit of Surgical Oncology, Department of Oncology & Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK.
2
Department of Oncology & Metabolism, Human Nutrition Unit, University of Sheffield, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK.
3
Molecular Gastroenterology Research Group, Academic Unit of Surgical Oncology, Department of Oncology & Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK. b.m.corfe@sheffield.ac.uk.
4
Insigneo Institute for In Silico Medicine, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK. b.m.corfe@sheffield.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low vitamin D status is associated with risk of colorectal cancer and has been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, relapsing, functional bowel disorder. A nascent literature suggests a role for vitamin D in IBS, but this has not been collated or critiqued. To date, seven studies have been published: four observational studies and three randomised controlled trials (RCTs). All observational studies reported that a substantial proportion of the IBS population was vitamin D deficient. Two intervention studies reported improvement in IBS symptom severity scores and quality of life (QoL) with vitamin D supplementation. There are limited data around the role of vitamin D in IBS.

CONCLUSIONS:

The available evidence suggests that low vitamin D status is common among the IBS population and merits assessment and rectification for general health reasons alone. An inverse correlation between serum vitamin D and IBS symptom severity is suggested and vitamin D interventions may benefit symptoms. However, the available RCTs do not provide strong, generalisable evidence; larger and adequately powered interventions are needed to establish a case for therapeutic application of vitamin D in IBS.

PMID:
29367731
DOI:
10.1038/s41430-017-0064-z
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