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Sci Rep. 2018 Jan 24;8(1):1483. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-19578-6.

A new dry eye mouse model produced by exorbital and intraorbital lacrimal gland excision.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.
2
Pharmacology Group, Non-Clinical Research, Global R&D Division, Santen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Ikoma, Japan.
3
Department of Frontier Medical Science and Technology for Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. mueta@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp.
4
Department of Frontier Medical Science and Technology for Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.

Abstract

Chronic dry eye is an increasingly prevalent condition worldwide, with resulting loss of visual function and quality of life. Relevant, repeatable, and stable animal models of dry eye are still needed. We have developed an improved surgical mouse model for dry eye based on severe aqueous fluid deficiency, by excising both the exorbital and intraorbital lacrimal glands (ELG and ILG, respectively) of mice. After ELG plus ILG excision, dry eye symptoms were evaluated using fluorescein infiltration observation, tear production measurement, and histological evaluation of ocular surface. Tear production in the model mice was significantly decreased compared with the controls. The corneal fluorescein infiltration score of the model mice was also significantly increased compared with the controls. Histological examination revealed significant severe inflammatory changes in the cornea, conjunctiva or meibomian glands of the model mice after surgery. In the observation of LysM-eGFP(+/-) mice tissues, postsurgical infiltration of green fluorescent neutrophils was observed in the ocular surface tissues. We theorize that the inflammatory changes on the ocular surface of this model were induced secondarily by persistent severe tear reduction. The mouse model will be useful for investigations of both pathophysiology as well as new therapies for tear-volume-reduction type dry eye.

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