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PLoS One. 2018 Jan 24;13(1):e0188695. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0188695. eCollection 2018.

Serum calcification propensity is independently associated with disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

Author information

1
Department of Nephrology and Hypertension lnselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
2
Department of Cardiology, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece.
3
Division of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine Specialties, University Hospital and School of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.
4
Division of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, University Hospital Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
5
Division of Internal Medicine and Clinical Immunology Laboratory, Department of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
6
Department of Nephrology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany.
7
Immunologie-Zentrum, Zurich, Switzerland.
8
Department of Biomedical Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
9
Calciscon AG, Nidau, Switzerland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with severe cardiovascular complications. The T50 score is a novel functional blood test quantifying calcification propensity in serum. High calcification propensity (or low T50) is a strong and independent determinant of all-cause mortality in various patient populations.

METHODS:

A total of 168 patients with ≥ 4 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria from the Swiss Systemic lupus erythematosus Cohort Study (SSCS) were included in this analysis. Serum calcification propensity was assessed using time-resolved nephelometry.

RESULTS:

The cohort mainly consisted of female (85%), middle-aged (43±14 years) Caucasians (77%). The major determinants of T50 levels included hemoglobin, serum creatinine and serum protein levels explaining 43% of the variation at baseline. Integrating disease activity (SELENA-SLEDAI) into this multivariate model revealed a significant association between disease activity and T50 levels. In a subgroup analysis considering only patients with active disease (SELENA-SLEDAI score ≥4) we found a negative association between T50 and SELENA-SLEDAI score at baseline (Spearman's rho -0.233, P = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

Disease activity and T50 are closely associated. Moreover, T50 levels identify a subgroup of SLE patients with ongoing systemic inflammation as mirrored by increased disease activity. T50 could be a promising biomarker reflecting SLE disease activity and might offer an earlier detection tool for high-risk patients.

PMID:
29364894
PMCID:
PMC5783342
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0188695
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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