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Tob Control. 2018 Nov;27(6):712-714. doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2017-054124. Epub 2018 Jan 23.

Public misperception that very low nicotine cigarettes are less carcinogenic.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
2
Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
3
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
4
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York City, New York, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The USA is considering a very low nicotine content (VLNC) cigarette standard. We sought to characterise the prevalence and correlates of the incorrect belief that VLNC cigarettes are less carcinogenic than current cigarettes, as this could reduce motivation to quit.

METHODS:

Participants were a nationally representative sample of 650 adult smokers in the USA. In 2015-2016, before the VLNC proposal became public, these smokers took part in an online survey. We used multivariate weighted analyses to calculate ORs and percentages and a χ2 test to examine the association between variables.

RESULTS:

Overall, 47.1% of smokers believed that smoking VLNC cigarettes for 30 years would be less likely to cause cancer than smoking current cigarettes. This misperception was more common among smokers who were aged above 55 (56.6%) and black (57.4%). Additionally, 23.9% of smokers reported they would be less likely to quit if the USA adopted a VLNC standard. Thinking that VLNC cigarettes would be less carcinogenic was associated with smokers reporting they would be less likely to quit (P<0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Many smokers had the misperception that smoking VLNC cigarettes is less likely to cause cancer, and some stated that they would be less likely to quit. A VLNC standard may be more effective if accompanied by a communication campaign that emphasises the continued dangers of smoking VLNC cigarettes due to the many toxic chemicals in smoke.

KEYWORDS:

cessation; harm reduction; nicotine; public opinion; public policy

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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